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Texas Rooster Oil Painting
Original Oil on Canvas 32" x 32"

Texas Rooster Oil Painting by Richard Ancheta

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Texas Rooster Oil Painting


This painting is handcrafted by Richard Ancheta

All Rights Reserved, Artist Copyright

Atelier Ancheta,
4155 rue Verdun,
Verdun, Quebec
H4G 1L2

Tel: (514) 8759686

atelierancheta@bellnet.ca

Texas Rooster

Texas rooster is a breed for cockfighting, famous for their beautiful multi-color feathers and braveness with stamina to fight using their powerful spar, talons and beaks.

A rooster also known as a cockerel or cock, is a male gallinaceous bird. The term usually refers to a male chicken (Gallus gallus).

Immature male chickens less than one year old are called cockerels. The term "rooster" originates in the United States, and the term is widely used throughout North America, as well as Australia and New Zealand. The older terms "cock" or "cockerel", the latter denoting a young cock, are used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

"Roosting" is the action of perching aloft to sleep at night, which is done by both sexes. The rooster is polygamous, but cannot guard several nests of eggs at once. He guards the general area where his hens are nesting, and will attack other roosters that enter his territory. During the daytime, a rooster will often sit on a high perch, usually 3 to 5 feet (1 m to 1.5 m) off the ground, to serve as a lookout for his flock. He will sound a distinctive alarm call if predators are nearby.

 

Cockfight

A cockfight is a blood sport between two roosters (cocks), or more accurately gamecocks, held in a ring called a cockpit. The first documented use of the word gamecock, denoting use of the cock as to a “game”, a sport, pastime or entertainment, was recorded in 1646, after the term “cock of the game” used by George Wilson, in the earliest known book on the sport of cockfighting in The Commendation of Cocks and Cock Fighting in 1607. But it was during Magellan's voyage of discovery of the Philippines in 1521 when modern cockfighting was first witnessed and documented by Antonio Pigafetta, Magellan's chronicler, in the kingdom of Taytay.


The combatants, referred to as gamecocks, are specially bred birds, conditioned for increased stamina and strength. The comb and wattle are cut off in order to meet show standards of the American Gamefowl Society and the Old English Game Club and to prevent freezing in colder climates (the standard emerged from the older practice of severing the comb, wattles, and earlobes of the bird in order to remove anatomical vulnerabilities, similar to the practice of docking a dog's tail and ears).


Cocks possess congenital aggression toward all males of the same species. Cocks are given the best of care until near the age of two years old. They are conditioned, much like professional athletes prior to events or shows. Wagers are often made on the outcome of the match. Cockfighting is a blood sport due in some part to the physical trauma the cocks inflict on each other. While not all fights are to the death, the cocks may endure significant physical trauma. In areas around the world, cockfighting is still practiced as a mainstream event; in some countries it is regulated by law, or forbidden outright. Advocates of the "age old sport" often list cultural and religious relevance as reasons for perpetuation of cockfighting as a sport.